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All about Studio Headphones

All about Studio Headphones

All about Studio Headphones

Headphones have completely changed the way we listen to music. They are very much a part of our daily lives now, from the gym to the kitchen they make their way with us, just about everywhere. Therefore, choosing a good pair of headphones is a must. But, people who use them in the recording studios and sound mixing need specialised kind of headphones to ensure the work is done well. People often have questions regarding headphones like, "which headphones are the best for recording and mixing?” The answer is not quite simple as it may seem. The headphones can be classified broadly in two design types, i.e., the open-back and the closed-back. Each of them has its own benefits and limitations. For instance, when one is tracking, the only reasonable pick are the closed-back headphone as it avoids monitoring leak from getting to the mics and thus any outside sound impacting the apparent monitor signal.

Earlier, closed-back headphones were not considered quite well for mixing and instead open-back can were used for the same. They still have a tendency to sound way more unspoilt as well as natural, particularly at the high notes. But, the technology used in closed-back phones has changed a lot, which makes them now functional for mixing if required, even though the preference is given to open-backed headphones, wherever possible. Also, it is significant to understand that just the prefix “studio” in the name would not make any pair of headphones good for use in recording and mixing sound. But, a thorough research of the features offered in a particular headphone needs to done before you pick them up. And, of course the amount you are paying for the specs and quality is an important factor too.

In daily life use closed back headphones offer you much more discretion and noise isolation as compared to open-back or semi-open back headphones. But, in a studio it is quite different and there open or semi-open designs are considered much better for mixing sound as it inhibits the stockpile of low-pitched frequencies within the headphone and permits more even, precise sound to play. While, closed-back designs are considered to be a better option for ‘recording’ as it stops outside noise from getting into the microphone of the headphone and then mixing in the track.

You will find great options for studio headphones to choose from, on our website, www.audiocheck.in. With value for money specifications, you would find high quality audio devices at your disposal.